,

Seafoam + Coral Chardon

 

This is the Chardon skirt by Deer and Doe. When I saw all the pretty colours of twill at Fabricland in Calgary this sprint, I just had to get some. These two colours go really well together and I knew they would make a perfect Chardon skirt. I know it’s now fall, but I’ve been enjoying the last few warm days in this skirt.

This is my fourth Chardon skirt, believe it or not (and I just finished a fifth this month as well). My first one has ended up in a charity bag because the colour wasn’t really me (it was bubblegum pink). It may have been the ‘me’ from about 12 years ago, when I originally purchased the fabric, but the 2016 me just wasn’t liking it so much, even though I loved the style and especially the pockets. My second two were meant for winter. One grey and one wine red. Those were both the mini versions, which look cute with leggings. I made one just before I left for Canada last winter, and the other one I made while I was there. They are really great basic skirts that go with pretty much anything.

This one is a little bit less basic, but still basic enough to be worn with a variety of summery prints and basics.

I got enough of the coral red to make another skirt, so I made the Brumby. Much like my first bubble-pink Chardon skirt, I was not incredibly pleased with my entire bottom half being pink, so I made my sister happy with it. I’m much happier with it just being a pop of colour in this skirt.

Construction:

Since I’d made this skirt a few times, I made a couple of changes worth noting here. First, I under stitched the facing. With my previous versions, I wasn’t happy that you could kind of see the facing at the top. This is especially true if you use a thicker fabric like a twill or denim. Secondly, also to help the facing stay down, I stitched in the ditch at the side seams. In my previous versions, I hand-tacked the facing down at the middle-front and sides. . If you add the belt loops, this is less of an issue because you’re sewing the facing down in several places.

Also, I finally figured out that I should rotate when top-stitching the pleats instead of sewing two separate lines of stitching. It’s a much neater finish and the stitching doesn’t come apart at the bottom either.

And I’m really warming up to invisible zippers! I really love the look of an invisible zipper in this skirt, even though it pulls a little at the waist.

What’s your favourite skirt pattern??

Thanks for stopping by!